Showing posts with label Fungus. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fungus. Show all posts

May 6, 2011

Top Eleven Uses for Mouthwash

The following presume to use the type of mouthwash with alcohol in it.

Nail fungus problems and athlete's foot are difficult to eradicate. Make up a 50/50 solution of alcohol-based mouthwash and vinegar, and apply to the affected area with a cotton ball two-to-three times per day. It make a week or more for the fungus, but only days to get rid of athlete's foot.
Apply some mouthwash to poison ivy infected areas and it will it relieve the itchiness and inflammation as well as dry up the area and begin the healing process.

Mouthwash is great for cleaning the kids’ hands in a pinch, as long as it is the alcohol-based and sugar-free kind.

When traveling mouthwash can be used as a substitute deodorant in a pinch, due to its bacteria-killing properties.

Of course mouthwash eliminates garlic odor in your mouth, but it can also take get rid of the smell of garlic on your hands after you’ve handled it. Just pour some on your hands, rub them together, and let them air-dry.

Mouthwash was first used as a surgical antiseptic before people figured out its mouth-washing properties. Apply some mouthwash to your wound, dry, and cover with a bandage.

By mixing two tablespoons of mouthwash per gallon of water and filling your flower vase with this mixture, your cut flowers will last longer because it kills the bacteria that accelerates decomposition.

Apply mouthwash on a damp cloth to wash glass surfaces. Dry with a cotton cloth.

In the same way that mouthwash removes bacteria from your mouth, you can remove it from your laundry as well. Add one cup to the regular cycle of a full load of laundry. This is especially handy for those stinky gym socks; mouthwash kills all the bacteria that is sometimes left behind in a regular wash.

Dunk your toothbrush in a cup of mouthwash before brushing to ensure your toothbrush is clean and free of bacteria.

The end - pour a cup of mouthwash into the toilet, let it sit for half an hour and swipe it with the toilet brush.

Mar 26, 2011


Scottish scientist Alexander Fleming's  desk was often littered with small glass dishes filled with bacteria cultures scraped from boils, abscesses, and infections. Fleming allowed the cultures to sit around for weeks, hoping something interesting would turn up.

One day, he decided to clean the bacteria-filled dishes and dumped them into a tub of disinfectant. He soon noticed a dish in the tub, which was still above the surface of the water and cleaning agent. As he did, Fleming suddenly saw a dab of fungus on one side of the dish, which had killed the bacteria. The fungus turned out to be a rare strain of penicillium that had drifted onto the dish from an open window.

Fleming began testing the fungus and found that it killed deadly bacteria, yet was harmless to human tissue. However, he was unable to produce it in any significant quantity and didn’t believe it would be effective in treating disease, but he wrote up the findings in a paper he presented to the scientific community. A decade later, another team of scientists followed up on his lead. Using more sophisticated techniques, they were able to successfully produce one of the most life-saving drugs in modern medicine.