Showing posts with label Garlic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Garlic. Show all posts

Jul 19, 2013

Seven Kitchen Tips

Microwave garlic cloves for 15 seconds and the skins slip off.
When working with dough, coat your with olive oil to prevent sticking.
Wrap celery in aluminum foil and put it in the refrigerator to keep for weeks.
Let raw potatoes stand in cold water for at least half an hour before frying to improve the crispness of french-fried potatoes.

Microwave lemons, limes, or oranges for 15 seconds in the microwave before squeezing them and you get twice as much juice.
After you drain pasta, while it’s still hot, grate some fresh Parmesan on top before tossing it with your sauce, so the sauce has more to stick to

Jan 24, 2012

Garlic Feet

Garlic is a great food enhancer, but is also a potent natural antifungal, making it ideal for treating fungal infections like athlete’s foot. Add a few cloves of crushed garlic to warm water in a foot bath and soak the affected feet for 30 minutes. I swear it is not trading one smell for another.

Jul 19, 2011

Six Mosquito Bite Fixes

Here are a few things that will take the sting out of mosquito bites. Just rub on and the sting will go away. White vinegar, toothpaste, lemon juice, ice, Garlic, aloe. All work about the same, but some smell better than others.

May 6, 2011

Top Eleven Uses for Mouthwash

The following presume to use the type of mouthwash with alcohol in it.

Nail fungus problems and athlete's foot are difficult to eradicate. Make up a 50/50 solution of alcohol-based mouthwash and vinegar, and apply to the affected area with a cotton ball two-to-three times per day. It make a week or more for the fungus, but only days to get rid of athlete's foot.
 
Apply some mouthwash to poison ivy infected areas and it will it relieve the itchiness and inflammation as well as dry up the area and begin the healing process.

Mouthwash is great for cleaning the kids’ hands in a pinch, as long as it is the alcohol-based and sugar-free kind.

When traveling mouthwash can be used as a substitute deodorant in a pinch, due to its bacteria-killing properties.

Of course mouthwash eliminates garlic odor in your mouth, but it can also take get rid of the smell of garlic on your hands after you’ve handled it. Just pour some on your hands, rub them together, and let them air-dry.

Mouthwash was first used as a surgical antiseptic before people figured out its mouth-washing properties. Apply some mouthwash to your wound, dry, and cover with a bandage.

By mixing two tablespoons of mouthwash per gallon of water and filling your flower vase with this mixture, your cut flowers will last longer because it kills the bacteria that accelerates decomposition.

Apply mouthwash on a damp cloth to wash glass surfaces. Dry with a cotton cloth.

In the same way that mouthwash removes bacteria from your mouth, you can remove it from your laundry as well. Add one cup to the regular cycle of a full load of laundry. This is especially handy for those stinky gym socks; mouthwash kills all the bacteria that is sometimes left behind in a regular wash.

Dunk your toothbrush in a cup of mouthwash before brushing to ensure your toothbrush is clean and free of bacteria.

The end - pour a cup of mouthwash into the toilet, let it sit for half an hour and swipe it with the toilet brush.

Sep 3, 2010

Reduce Garlic Breath

Scientists reviewing garlic odor recently came to the conclusion that water and fat can reduce garlic breath. They determined that milk, yogurt, a non-skim latte, or even ice cream, are all good breath fixers as they help move garlic quickly through your system.

Dec 11, 2009

Garlic and the Flu

If you want to get stinking rich in China today forget real estate, gold, or silver, because garlic has outperformed all of them. As fears of swine flu grow, traders are hoarding garlic and watching the price of the pungent vegetable go through the roof. Prices have risen sharply since unscrupulous investors began buying up all the garlic available.

According to China's Ministry of Commerce the average price for a kilogram of garlic has risen from 14p in March to 54p and in some markets the price has reportedly risen 40-fold.

Jerry Lou, an analyst for Morgan Stanley, said dealers can make millions. "You need a warehouse, a lot of cash and a few trucks," he told the Washington Post. Basically, you buy as much supply as possible, then bid up the price.

The reason for this is many people believe garlic can protect against the H1N1 virus.

In one high school in Hangzhou, staff bought 200kg of garlic and fed it to their luckless pupils every lunchtime for the good of their health.

China produces three times more garlic then the rest of the world combined, but anticipating falling prices during the world recession, its farmers planted less garlic last year. Speculators made fortunes by moving in and buying up the harvest before it was ripe.