Showing posts with label Calorie. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Calorie. Show all posts

Nov 25, 2017

Calorie Burning Food Myth Debunked

For many the day after a holiday brings guilt from holiday feasting, but do not fall into this myth trap. Myth: There is such a thing as "calorie-burning" foods.
If you have spent any amount of time researching diets on the web, you probably read articles about 'miracle foods' that are filled with negative calories and foods that have such a low caloric count that the stomach expends more calories digesting them than they contain. In addition to these negative-calorie foods, you can also find lists of other healthy foods that burn fat and some that magically target belly fat. Lately there are various diets which insist spicy foods will burn fat by magically heating up your metabolism. If all of this sounds too good to be true, it is.
There is no such thing as a diet that burns more calories than it provides. There are only diets that specifically cause you to lose weight through reduction in caloric intake. Food cannot reduce fat on its own.
Foods that are called negative calorie lean toward fruits or vegetables. Much of the weight loss you experience eating these foods is water weight, which returns when you start eating normally again.
The only reason you lose weight by eating these foods is that the diet plan they come with requires you to consume less calories. Those fat-burning supplements work on the same principle. You lose weight because you are starving yourself.

Bottom line, the only miracle performed by so-called 'miracle foods' is that they allow you to trick yourself into believing it is the food, not the reduction in calories.

Sep 28, 2013

Yogurt Debate

Almost 28% of Americans eat yogurt on a daily basis.  Yogurt comes from milk that has healthy bacteria added for fermentation. During this process, yogurt thickens and takes on a slightly tangy taste. Yogurt is then strained through a cheesecloth, which allows the liquid whey part of milk to drain off. Regular yogurt is strained twice and Greek yogurt is strained three times to remove more whey, making it thicker.

Greek yogurt has almost double the protein of regular yogurt. Eight ounces of Greek yogurt has about 20 grams of protein and regular yogurt 11-13 grams. Greek yogurt has fewer carbohydrates than regular yogurt. Regular yogurt has about three times the calcium of Greek yogurt. Greek yogurt has half the sodium of regular yogurt. Plain, nonfat versions of Greek and regular yogurt have a similar calorie count per serving. Greek yogurt does not curdle when heated like regular yogurt. Greek yogurt, on average costs twice as much as regular yogurt. Bottom line, for one serving a day, not much difference, except a little texture, maybe taste, and a much higher cost.

Apr 3, 2013

Calories and calories

Deserts do not have Calories, but desserts do. Of course, getting your just deserts means getting what you deserve. So getting your deserts and getting your desserts might be the same thing. No wonder there is such confusion about the words.

Calories share the same type of confusion. A calorie is a unit of measure required to increase the temperature of one kilogram of water one degree Celsius. A food Calorie is actually 1,000 calories compared to calories in chemistry. Usually calories are spelled with a small "c" and food Calories spelled with capital "C".

Food Calories are counted,  according to the National Data Lab, based on an indirect calorie estimation made using the Atwater system. The total caloric value is calculated by adding up the calories provided by the energy-containing nutrients: protein, carbohydrate, fat and alcohol. Because carbohydrates contain some fiber that is not digested and utilized by the body, the fiber component is usually subtracted from the total carbohydrate before calculating calories. The label on a food item that contains 10 g of protein, 20 g of carbohydrate and 9 g of fat would read 201 kcals or Calories.

Jan 1, 2013


These are words that change their meaning based on whether the first letter is capitalized or not. Capitonyms are particularly troublesome when they appear at the beginning of a sentence, as there is no way, based on the single word alone to tell which meaning is being referred to.

Examples of these include: August vs. august (month vs majestic or venerable); Calorie vs. calorie (1000 calories (food) vs. 1 calorie); Divine vs. divine (related to God vs. to discover by intuition or insight); etc.